Historic Powell River




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A couple of weeks ago Janis and I visited our friends Paul and Cheryl for the weekend. They recently retired to Powell River, though Cheryl still telecommutes. A lot of people think the Sunshine Coast is just the Sechelt Peninsula, but that’s only about half of it. It actually extends all the way to Lund, about a half hour north of Powell River. When you take the ferry from Earl’s Cove, there’s a big sign greeting you at Saltery Bay that says, “Welcome dude, you’ve like totally made it up to the Top of the Sunshine Coast!” Yeah, the Sunshine Coast is pretty laid back, dude!

Hey dude!
Hey dude!

To get there from Vancouver, you need to take the Langdale Ferry from Horseshoe Bay. The Sechelt is isolated and you can only get there and back by ferry, so when you go, you’re buying a return ticket. You don’t have to buy a ticket to go back to the mainland. At Langdale, you drive up the peninsula to Earl’s Cove and then the ferry hop to Saltery Bay.  Here’s a money-saving tip. Buy an Experience Card online from B.C. Ferries. It gets you discounted rates on many of the ferries plying the coast, including the ones to and from the Sechelt.

Powell River is about 28 kilometres from Saltery Bay, a half hour drive. It’s an old mill town which has done much to preserve some of its history. The mill was built in 1908 and the company town in 1910. The mill was, at one time, the largest pulp and paper mill in the world. But the mill has seen better days and is a shadow of its former self, though still operating.  Our hosts told us that the average age in Powell River is eight years higher than the provincial average as so many people have moved away to find work. And many seniors are finding it an attractive place to retire.

The Powell River Mill and the Hulks
The Powell River Mill and the Hulks

There is a lookout along the highway that offers a panoramic view of the mill and the Incredible Hulks. The hulks are a collection of old concrete ships that have been chained together to form a breakwater. An information board tells us that the hulks have been a feature of the waterfront since 1930. “Over the years, 19 ships built of wood, steel and reinforced concrete have been brought to Powell River for use in the breakwater. (They) were built for use in the 1st and 2nd World Wars when there was a shortage of plate steel for ships construction.” They were unable to compete with steel ships when peace arrived.

One of the hulks. Picture courtesy Paul Miniato
One of the hulks. Picture courtesy Paul Miniato

The old historic townsite has been designated a National Historic District “with over 400 original buildings contained within the original borders of the 1910 town plan.” Our hosts took us for a casual drive through the old town and pointed out many of its historic buildings. I’ll include most of them in a separate photo gallery and there is a link at the end of the article to the townsite’s website. Here I’ll focus on one particular building, the Patricia Theatre.

The historic Patricia Theatre
The historic Patricia Theatre

The Patricia was originally at the location where the Cenotaph is today. Built in 1913, it featured silent films with live piano accompaniment. The actors John Barrymore and Delores Costello visited the theatre in person in the 1920s.  In 1928, it was relocated to a new building, the current one shown in the picture above. Still operating today, it is the oldest continuously operating movie theatre in Canada.

Paul, Cheryl, Janis and I attended a movie showing (Florence Foster Jenkins starring Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant) and I wish I had brought my camera. The interior is amazing with large mural panels and an old style feel to the place. The projection equipment was modernized to run digital movies at a cost of $90,000 in 2012, funds raised by volunteers of the historical society.  You can see more pictures at the theatre’s official website, linked at the end of this article.

Some of the carefully maintained residences of the historic townsite.
Some of the carefully maintained homes of the historic townsite. These larger ones on the main drag belonged to mill executives and management originally.

Powell River abounds in hiking and nature trails as well. One easily accessible trail is the Willingdon Beach Trail just off Marine Avenue. The trail used to be a logging road and it is now a walking trail and an outdoor museum. All along the trail are logging artifacts of a bygone era, each with signs explaining what we see.

Steam donkey
Steam donkey dating from the 1920s.

The pièce de résistance is a steam donkey that the Powell River Forestry Museum Society managed to retrieve from a ridge north of Haywire Bay on Powell Lake. The society preserved it and moved it by helicopter to the Willingdon Beach Trail in 2001-2002. The steam donkey is a steam-powered winch or logging engine. This particular one is #357 built by the Empire Manufacturing Company in 1920 and used into the 1960s.

Tree growing out of an old stump.
Tree growing out of an old stump.

Not only are there a lot of logging artifacts, the flora along the trail are a great example of how the forest renews itself. Heavily logged at one time, you’ll find many trees growing out of the stumps of long gone  brethren.

At the head of the trail is a sign telling you that you can get an audio guide on your cellphone by visiting Project Art Zoundzones. Just click on the link for the Willingdon Beach Trail.

This is just one of four city trails, each two kilometres or less. The others are the Willingdon Creek Trail, the Sea Walk Trail and the Valentine Mountain Trail. But for the serious hiker, there are many more.

Inland Lake Trail is a beautiful 13 kilometre walking path around the lake. The trail is well groomed and maintained and hugs the shoreline. At some points it goes out over the water along boardwalks.  And it is remote enough to be away from the noise and traffic of the city.

Janis and Cheryl walking along the Inland Lake Trail.
Janis and Cheryl walking along the Inland Lake Trail. This is one of several boardwalks along the trail which circumnavigates the lake.

There are always a number of activities going on in Powell River, especially on the weekends, including a regular farmers market. The city itself is much larger than in the company town days as a number of towns and villages were incorporated into the city. One has the colorful name of Cranberry.

One day our hosts took us to Lund 24 kilometres up the road. Along the way we visited the Okeover Inlet Marina, a very picturesque spot. On a ridge above the marina is the Laughing Oyster Restaurant, a fine dining experience with a magnificent view. Alongside the dock you’ll find many of the tiny jellyfish common in coastal B.C. waters.

Cheryl, Janis and Paul at the Okeover Inlet Marina
Cheryl, Janis and Paul at the Okeover Inlet Marina

Lund is a small coastal village with a fair size marina, several restaurants, a hotel and several shops including an art gallery gift shop. It is also the beginning of Highway 101, also known as the Pacific Coastal Route. This highway network runs 15,202 kilometres to Quellon, Poro Monte, Chile, one of the longest roadways in the world.

Mile 0 Marker of the Pacific Coastal Highway.
Mile 0 Marker of the Pacific Coastal Highway.

Lund was founded by a Swede named Charlie Thulin in 1889. He called it Lund after a place in Sweden. Today the town also serves as the home of the Savary Island Water Taxi. It is a passenger only ferry. All cars on Savary were barged in. Savary Island is itself worth a visit. We were there back in the 1990s. But that is a topic for another post.

Panoramic shot of Lund harbour.
Panoramic shot of Lund harbour.

On Sunday evening, our last night before heading back Monday morning, we went for dinner to a nice little place on the south end of town called the Savoury Bight Seaside Restaurant. In front of the restaurant is a magnificent wooden sculpture of a giant lobster eating the tentacle of an octopus. It was carved by chainsaw at a logging show a while back.

The Savoury Bight lobster.
The Savoury Bight lobster.

Dinner was served on an outdoor patio which proffered a view of a magnificent sunset while we ate. The food was pretty good too.

Sunset from the patio of the Savoury Bight Restaurant.
Sunset from the patio of the Savoury Bight Restaurant.

The Sunshine Coast from Saltery Bay to Lund offers plenty for the visitor, whether it is the historic aspects of the area or the many natural wonders to take in. It is a hiker’s and camper’s dream with facilities along Powell and other lakes and along the coast. There is a lot to do there.

Be sure to check out the additional photo galleries linked below as well as some significant websites you’ll find useful. Click on the links for the photo galleries or scroll on down if you are on the main page.


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Photo Gallery: Powell River Historic Townsite




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Here are some additional photos of Powell River’s historic townsite.

The first home built in the townsite, Dr. Henderson's house was built to entice the doctor to come to the city. At the time all the workers lived in tents and shacks.
The first home built in the townsite, Dr. Henderson’s house was built to entice the doctor to come to the city. At the time all the workers lived in tents and shacks.
St. Luke's Hospital, built by Dr. Henderson in 1913.
St. Luke’s Hospital, built by Dr. Henderson in 1913.
Arbutus Apartments, formerly Oceanview Apartments. It was built to house married employees with no children in 1916.
Arbutus Apartments, formerly Oceanview Apartments. It was built to house married employees with no children in 1916.
Chief Superintendant's home
A couple of the homes built for management at the Powell River Company in the 1910s.
The historic Patricia Theatre, oldest continuously operated movie theatre in Canada.
The historic Patricia Theatre, oldest continuously operated movie theatre in Canada. St. John’ United Church stands behind it, built in 1913 as St. John’s Union Church.
Dwight Hall, built in 1927, housed a library and a veteran's lodge.
Dwight Hall, built in 1927, housed a library and a veteran’s lodge.
The Rodmay Hotel, originally the Powell River Hotel, was the first commercial building in town, built in 1911. It was sold in 1917 to Rod and may McIntyre, who renamed it the Rodmay.
The Rodmay Hotel, originally the Powell River Hotel, was the first commercial building in town, built in 1911. It was sold in 1917 to Rod and May McIntyre, who renamed it the Rodmay.
The Bank of Montreal building built in 1931. Before then the company dealt with the Bank of Commerce, but when they turned don a loan request, the company enticed the Bank of Montreal to set up shop by offering the building.
The Bank of Montreal building built in 1931. Before then the company dealt with the Bank of Commerce, but when they turned down a loan request, the company enticed the Bank of Montreal to set up shop by offering the building.
Formerly the Provincial Building, this fine structure was built in 1939 and housed the B.C. Police, the courthouse, forestry service and other government offices.
Formerly the Provincial Building, this fine structure was built in 1939 and housed the B.C. Police, the courthouse, forestry service and other government offices.
Some of the more modest homes built for rank and file workers.
Some of the more modest homes built for rank and file workers.

Next: Photo Gallery: Willingdon Beach Trail



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Photo Gallery: Willingdon Beach Trail in Powell River




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Here are some additional photos of the Willingdon Beach Trail in Powell River.

Willingdon Beach Park. The trail starts t the end of this path.
Willingdon Beach Park. The trail starts off to the right at the end of the park.
The Willingdon Beach Trail features many interesting arboreal features such as this fallen tree that found new life.
The Willingdon Beach Trail features many interesting arboreal features such as this fallen tree that found new life.
An old boomboat
An old boomboat that served at Weyerhaeuser’s Stillwater Sort.
A logging arch. This was pulled by bulldozer and reduced the damage done by skidding logs.
A logging arch. This was pulled by bulldozer and reduced the damage done by skidding logs.
A grader
A road grader used at Haslam Lake in the 1920s.
A bulldozer
A Caterpillar bulldozer built in 1941.
Stiff arm swing boom dragline.
Stiff arm swing boom dragline.
A pole wheel truck. This was like a railway car but rode on log poles instead of steel tracks. A steam donkey lowered the truck by winch to unload logs into the lake.
A pole wheel truck. This was like a railway car but rode on log poles instead of steel tracks. A steam donkey lowered the truck by winch to unload logs into the lake.
The steam donkey.
The steam donkey.
Tree growing out of another fallen tree.
Tree growing out of another fallen tree.
This squirrel is just one of many wild animals living in the area. We spotted a large bear scat on the trail. I took a picture of it, but you don't really want to see it.
This squirrel is just one of many wild animals living in the area. We also spotted a large bear scat on the trail. I took a picture of it, but you don’t really want to see that, do you?



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Photo Gallery: Additional Photos of Powell River and the Northern Sunshine Coast




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Here are some additional pictures in and around Powell River and the northern Sunshine Coast.

This sign shows the hulks currently forming the breakwater.
This sign shows the hulks currently forming the breakwater.
Nice closeup of one of the hulks. Photo courtesy Kathy Lowther.
Nice closeup of one of the hulks. Photo courtesy Kathy Lowther.
Inland Lake
Inland Lake
Boardwalk along Inland Lake
Boardwalk along Inland Lake
Inland Lake is a western toad habitat.
Inland Lake is a western toad habitat.
Some of the frogs in the area are not native here and prey on the young toadlets.
Some of the frogs in the area are not native here and prey on the young toadlets.
Another scenic shot of Inland Lake.
Another scenic shot of Inland Lake.
Across from Willingdon Beach is Putters Mini-Golf and Ice Cream Stand. I rather liked the Edvard Munchian blackboard. I ordered a double scooper. I'd like to see one of those Honkers though! Four scoops! Yikes!
Across from Willingdon Beach is Putters Mini-Golf and Ice Cream Stand. I rather liked the Edvard Munchian blackboard. I ordered a double scooper. I’d like to see one of those Honkers though! Four scoops! Yikes!
Okeover Inlet Marina
Okeover Inlet Marina
Looking up at the Laughing Oyster Restaurant on the ridge above.
Looking up at the Laughing Oyster Restaurant on the ridge above.
Okeover Inlet Marina
Okeover Inlet Marina
The hotel at Lund
The hotel at Lund
Nancy's Bakery in Lund. We had a light lunch here.
Nancy’s Bakery in Lund. We had a light lunch here.
Lund Marina
Lund Marina


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Stopover in Sydney




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We flew home from Perth on Friday with a stopover in Sydney. The layover was 23 hours so we booked a hotel for the night and spent a good half day checking out the sights. Wanting to see the landmark Sydney Opera House, we booked a hotel within a kilometer of the famed venue.

Upon arrival however, we had no idea exactly where it was so we hopped on a shuttle bus. Few of the hotels have free shuttle service from the airport so it cost us $30 for the two of us. There was a train service to downtown but we didn’t know exactly where the two downtown stations were with respect to the hotel so we opted for front door delivery.

As the above map shows, the opera house stands at the end of the center point of three points that, with their two bays, form a W. The left bank of the left side of the W is an old section of downtown Sydney called The Rocks. Our hotel was the Holiday Inn on George Street, just a block from the Overseas Passenger Terminal. And, we found, everything is only a short walk away.

The skyscrapers of downtown Sydney form a backdrop to the wharves of Circular Quay.
The skyscrapers of downtown Sydney form a backdrop to the wharves of Circular Quay.

The opera house is connected to the cruise ship terminal by a broad pedestrian walk called the Circular Quay. At the center of the quay are five ferry wharves that are home to ferries plying the waters to many different areas of the city. Old Sydney is at the center of a waterway marked by many inlets.

As we emerged from the side street leading to the bay, we found ourselves on the quay. To our left was a cruise ship terminal. Behind and above that was the Sydney Harbour Bridge, noted for welcoming in the New Year every year with a spectacular fireworks display. And across the bay was the opera house, its iconic sails jutting into the sky.

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The Sydney Opera House sits on an arm of land across from the cruise ship terminal.

Although we arrived on a wet, rainy, and fairly miserable day, we decided we wouldn’t let the weather dampen our spirits. We started to walk along the quay and came across a circular plaque in the ground. Joseph Conrad it read and featured a short quote from the man and noted his relationship to Australia. Very cool. A short distance further we came across another plaque about another author. Then another. It turns out the entire quay is dotted with such plaques, part of the Writers Walk.

The center plaque for the Writers Walk tells about this project.
The center plaque for the Writers Walk tells about this project.

Halfway along the quay is a plaque explaining it. Dedicated in 1991 by the Minister for the Arts, Peter Collins, it reads “What we are and how we see ourselves evolves fundamentally from the written and spoken word. The Writers Walk demonstrates that this evolutionary process continues to channel the thoughts and perceptions, the hopes and fears of writers who have known this great city and its people.”

As a blogger and writer I was quite fascinated by this and snapped photos of sixteen of the two dozen or so authors. Mostly writers I knew of or whose works I had heard of and one I had never heard of but whose quote I found particularly moving. I’ll post a separate photo gallery of the sixteen plaques I shot, authors that include such notables as Mark Twain, Jack London, Germaine Greer, James Michener and Arthur Conan Doyle.

We walked along the quay past the wharves and a selection of restaurants to the other side. Above the complex of restaurants and shops is the Circular Quay train station. Sydney Trains is a private-public partnership between the government of New South Wales and the Reliance Rail Consortium. $3.6 billion of modern rolling stock was acquired in 2006.

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A train is just emerging from the Circular Quay station.  The Cahill Expressway which takes you to the Sydney Harbour Bridge runs right over top of the station.

We followed the trail of writers, passing many shops and restaurants along the way. Sidewalk patios were everywhere. The harbour bridge stood out across the water.

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The Sydney Harbour Bridge

And then, as we passed the last of the high-rise apartment buildings flanking the quay, we saw the opera house again.

The Sydney Opera House
The Sydney Opera House with its sweeping steps and soaring sails.

We were struck by how different it looked live than in pictures. Photos always seem to show it with dazzling white sails. In fact, the tiles are alternating white and beige. And they are an off-white, a sort of creamy white. However, in photos, including the ones I took in the rain, the sails appear white.

The sails are made of alternating beige and white tiles which show up as a dazzling white in photos.
The sails are made of alternating beige and white tiles which show up as a dazzling white in photos. This close-up shot shows their actual colours.

On the shuttle bus ride to our hotel, we heard an ad on the radio for the show at the opera house and we thought it would be great fun to actually attend a show. A new production of My Fair Lady was on. However, it just happened to be opening night for the show and it was completely sold out.

Interior of the opera house.
Interior of the opera house.

But we were able to go in to the ticket sales wicket and did see some of the grand interior. Tours of the complex were available but we thought it a bit pricey at $37  person so we declined.

The interior captured through a window.
The interior captured through a window.

We wandered back out to walk around the opera house. Off to the left and circling the bay was the Royal Botanic Gardens, celebrating its 200th anniversary this year, and the Domain, a large 34 hectare park. With nicer weather and more time, we would certainly have walked through it. As it was, we just looked at it from afar.

The Royal Botanical Gardens
The Royal Botanic Gardens start at the foot of the opera house and wrap around the bay.

Circling the opera house we ended up at the rear which faced the water. The larger wing here is the main concert hall. It is the largest of the sails.

Large sail over the concert hall
Large sail over the concert hall

Continuing around the opera house we catch an excellent view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge again. I noticed some little spikes along the curved summit of the bridge. They were moving. People? I changed to a zoom lens and took a couple of pics and a movie. Indeed, people were walking at the top of the bridge.

People walking along the arch at the top of the bridge.
People walking along the arch at the top of the bridge.

I looked it up afterwards and there is a company called BridgeClimb. They offer a variety of bridge climbing experiences including an evening walk as well as a sunrise walk. If you’re fearful of heights, you can get a package that only goes half way up. These excursions don’t come cheap. Prices range from AU$158 for the Sampler Climb (half way to the top) to AU$383 for a twilight or dawn climb. Cheapest climb to the top is $278. Prices are less for children. Despite the price, it’s on my bucket list. If I’m ever back in Sydney, damn it, I want to walk along the top of that bridge. What a rush that would be!

Continuing along we came across a lot of restaurants along the lower concourse, many with outdoor patios. Prices at the restaurants vary though we were told that they get more expensive the closer you are to the opera house.

Restaurants and outdoor patios ring the Circular Quay
Restaurants and outdoor patios ring the Circular Quay

It was around 4 PM now so we stopped for a bite at a little Italian place across from Wharf # 6.

Janis and I have dinner at the Rossini Cafe on Circular Quay
Janis and I have dinner at the Rossini Cafe on Circular Quay

After dinner we headed back towards the opera house again to visit a few shops. One called Aboriginal Art Galleries specialized in aboriginal art and had a massive display of didgeridoos, the long pipelike instrument with a very distinctive sound. Not as easy to play as you think. My daughter’s fiancé had gotten me one for my birthday on our last trip. I got the shop keeper to demonstrate for me on tape.

Did you play that video? Did you listen to that sound? Isn’t that amazing?

It was getting darker as we left the shop so we walked a bit further to get a glimpse of the opera house lit up at night. It was spectacular.

The Sydney Opera House at night.
The Sydney Opera House at night.

Then we headed back around to the cruise ship terminal. There was a large crowd of teenagers there, many dressed to the nines. Some sort of grad party maybe. A couple of gals were standing nearby as we walked past. Two young guys approached them and one of the girls opened up her jacket and showed the mickey sticking out of her inside jacket pocket. These kids were ready to party!

A large party of teens were gathering at the cruise ship terminal. Dressed in tight dresses and high heels, suit jackets for the guys, these kids were ready to party.
A large party of teens were gathering at the cruise ship terminal. Dressed in tight dresses and high heels, suit jackets for the guys, these kids were ready to party.

We decided to walk past the terminal to see if we could get to the bridge. The rain had let up so we could close the umbrella. The temperature was mild and pleasant. We passed a long row of restaurants. In front of them were masts – a nautical theme to the whole row. The dinner hour had just started and we could see tables with white cloths inside. The upper floors had large open doorways with people casually standing in them even though they opened on empty space.

The restaurant row just up from the cruise ship terminal.
The restaurant row just up from the cruise ship terminal.

To our right was the Park Hyatt Hotel with the Sydney Harbour Bridge showing behind and above it. Large colour slides of footy (soccer) players were being projected on one of the bridge supports.

The Sydney Hyatt
Sydney’s Park Hyatt Hotel with the bridge behind it. A footy player is projected onto the bridge tower.

We walked around the hotel and came to a small park which commanded a great view of everything, the bridge, the opera house, the city.

We headed left and followed a narrow road beside a steep wall with large ivies growing up it. At the end was an old building with a large smokestack above it. The building was a power station from 1902-1908. Today it serves as the Arts Exchange. It is “an operations hub for Sydney’s major festivals and key arts organisations”. Tenants include a dozen different arts groups.

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Once a power station and a mining museum, this old building is now the Arts Exchange.

We soon came to another grand old building in this historic section of the city. It stood at the edge of the parking lot for the cruise ship terminal. A sign at the front indicated one of the tenants was Emerge Capital, a large investment bank.

This old building is home to Emerge Capital and other tenants.
This old building is home to Emerge Capital and maybe some other tenants as well.

We walked a short distance more and found we had come full circle back to our hotel. Not planned. Just serendipity.

We got a good night’s sleep and in the morning took the train to the airport.  The train is slightly more expensive than the shuttle bus, but the bus took us an hour to get to the hotel in all the crazy traffic. The train takes just fifteen minutes to get to the airport. The train is a much better option.

It was a bright sunny day. Too bad the previous day had been so rainy. So I grabbed a few sunny pictures from the station platform to round out our visit.

The Sydney Harbour Bridge in the sunshine
The Sydney Harbour Bridge in the sunshine as seen from the train station.

Sydney is spectacular. The old part of the city around the Rocks and the Circular Quay is very accessible. The architecture and scenery is amazing, even in the rain. We will definitely visit Sydney again. Hopefully for a longer visit next time.

There are two additional photo albums for you to check out. Just click on the links below or scroll on down if you are on the main page. I’ve included additional links of interest as well.




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Photo Gallery: Sydney, Australia




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Here are some additional photos of our all too short visit to Sydney.

The Sydney Harbour Bridge seen from the steps to the Sydney Opera House
The Sydney Harbour Bridge seen from the steps to the Sydney Opera House
Fairground on the opposite shore under the bridge
Fairground on the opposite shore under the bridge
The Sydney Opera House at night seen from the other side of the bay.
The Sydney Opera House at night seen from the other side of the bay.
Some of the smaller sails of the Sydney Opera House
The front of the Sydney Opera House
Some of the tile work on the sails of the opera house
Some of the tile work on the sails of the opera house
Rear of the opera house
Rear of the opera house
People at the top of the bridge
People at the top of the bridge
One of the many ferry boats plying these waters
One of the many ferry boats plying these waters. Most of them are green and yellow like this one.
The Kirribilli district across the inlet from the opera house
The Kirribilli district across the inlet from the opera house
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The Kirribilli district
Low cloud cover obscures some of the downtown highrises giving the area an ethereal quality.
Low cloud cover obscures some of the downtown skscrapers giving the area an ethereal quality.
Skyline in the mist
Skyline in the mist
The broad plaza of Circular Quay wet with rain
The broad plaza of Circular Quay wet with rain.A couple of ferries are parked at the wharves.
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A train rolls through the station as people walk the plaza below.
Spectacular view of the city at night.
Spectacular view of the city at night.
Another nice shot of the skyline at night
Another nice shot of the skyline at night
An excursion boat leaves the wharf
An excursion boat leaves the wharf. Not likely to be whale watching at this time of night though.
The back of the building housing Emerge Capital.
The back of the building housing Emerge Capital I think. See third picture below.
Open doors on the second floors of the restaurants here
Open doors on the second and third floors of the restaurants here
The vine covered wall.
The vine covered wall.
The old building near the cruise terminal.
The old building near the cruise terminal.
The Art Museum
The Museum of Contemporary Art
The bridge in the morning sun
The bridge in the morning sun
Flags atop the bridge
Flags atop the bridge

You may also want to check out my photo gallery of the Writers Walk. And the original article on Sydney if you missed it.




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Photo Gallery: The Writers Walk, Sydney




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Here are some of the plaques marking the Writers Walk along Sydney, Australia’s Circular Quay. The last three were taken at night with a flash and appear to be a little different in colour. Those colours are actually more accurate. These are just sixteen of the two dozen or so writers with plaques. The others were writers I am not familiar with. I was not familiar with Oodgeroo Noonuccal below, but I really liked the quote. The others below I had heard of or heard of some of their works, though I have not read all of their works, if any. I have added the quotes below the picture if the picture is smudged or partly illegible.

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“Mankind was destined to live on the edge of perpetual disaster. We are mankind because we survive. We do it in a half-assed way, but we do it.”

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The Domain in the quote is the 34 hectare park that wraps around the bay.

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