An Epistle About the Ephesians




Follow us on Facebook!

You may recall the New Testament book called Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians. The Ephesians were the people of an ancient city called Ephesus. Today its ruins have been well excavated though new excavation continues to this day. This archaeological site is about twenty kilometres from the Turkish port city of Kusadasi.

DCIM100SPORT
The ancient city of Ephesus lives on through its archaeological ruins.

Built in the 10th Century BC, Ephesus was a flourishing Greek city for almost a thousand years. The Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, (around 550 BC) was near here. Little of the temple remains today.

In 129 B.C. the city fell into Roman hands. In 88 BC a short-lived revolt brought self-rule to Ephesus  but two years later it was back under Roman control. There was also some Egyptian influence in the city. King Ptolemy XII Auletes retired there in 57 BC. And Mark Antony visited there with Cleopatra in 33 BC.

Ephesus was made the capital of Proconsular Asia under Caesar Augustus around 27 BC as it entered a new age of prosperity. “It was second in importance and size only to Rome,” notes Wikipedia.

The Gate of Augustus
The Gate of Augustus

In the 50s AD Christianity made a profound influence on the city as the apostle Paul lived there from 52-54 AD. The city is referenced in Paul’s epistle, the Acts of the Apostles and in the Book of Revelations.

Sacked by the Goths in 263 AD, the city was rebuilt by Constantine the Great who built the new public baths. It remained the most important city of the Byzantine Empire after Constantine.  But the city declined after an earthquake in 614 and conquests by the Arabs and later the Turks. By the 15th Century the city was completely abandoned.

Much of the archaeological site is Roman, one of the largest Roman archaeological digs in the world.

When we arrived in Kusadasi, there were lines of buses to take everyone on their excursions. Most were going to Ephesus. Our guide was a genial fellow who told us a bit about the history of modern Turkey as our bus wended its way on the twenty kilometre trek to the site.

About fifty buses were parked cheek by jowl on the pier aaiting tourists.
About fifty buses were parked cheek by jowl on the pier awaiting tourists.

Our guide was very proud of Turkey. He explained that Turkey does not have many of the troubles so common in other areas of the middle east. The reason, he explained, was because the father of modern Turkey, Kemal Ataturk, set out to recreate Turkey as a secular state, a modern, western state. He served as the first President from 1923 until his death in 1938. His reforms included recognizing the equal civil and political rights of women, taking them out from under the yoke of Islam. He abolished the caliphate and sharia courts. He reformed education introducing mandatory secular schooling. He encouraged Turks to adopt  western style clothing.

ataturk
Mustafa Kemal Ataturk

Ataturk’s attitude can be summarized in this excerpt from a 1925 speech: “In the face of knowledge, science, and of the whole extent of radiant civilization, I cannot accept the presence in Turkey’s civilized community of people primitive enough to seek material and spiritual benefits in the guidance of sheiks. The Turkish republic cannot be a country of sheiks, dervishes, and disciples. The best, the truest order is the order of civilization. To be a man it is enough to carry out the requirements of civilization.”

Turkey remains a democratic, westernized country though its majority religion remains Islam. Wikipedia notes that according to a Gallup poll on Religiousity, 73 percent of of Turkey’s Islam adherents are “irreligious Muslims” and only 7 to 13 percent think religion should have any influence on the law. Unfortunately, religious fundamentalists and radicals have engaged in the occasional act of terrorism in Turkey trying to swing it to an Islamic state.

In any event, our guide was most informative and very proud of Turkey’s secularism and western traditions. He also got off the bus and was our guide through the ruins of Ephesus.

DCIM100SPORT
Our tour took us down this roadway to the Celsus Library.

Along the road to the landmark Celsus Library, we passed a number of other landmarks including the Temple of Hadrian. Hadrian was the Roman Emporer best known for building Hadrian’s Wall in Britain.

The Temple of Hadrian
The Temple of Hadrian

Another landmark were the baths built by Constantine the Great. Ephesus was a large and modern city and had running water. The baths were surrounded by public toilets which opened onto a channel of running water to carry the effluent away.

Public toilets near the baths.
Public toilets near the baths.

Further along we came to wide plaza in front of the famous Celsus Library. This library was built between 100 and 110 AD for the senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus. Destroyed by an earthquake in 270 AD, some remnants of the facade remained and it was rebuilt between 1970 and 1978.

Our guide delighted in telling us that the city’s brothel was located near the library and many a Roman would tell his wife he was going to the library when he was really pursuing less intellectual endeavours.

DCIM100SPORT
The Celsus Library – just a facade now

We passed through the Gate of Augustus beside the library and emerged onto a wide thoroughfare where we watched a recreation of the visit of Antony and Cleopatra to Ephesus in 33 BC. Here we also came to a large amphitheatre.

Janis and I in front of the Roman amphitheatre at Ephesus
Janis and I in front of the Roman amphitheatre at Ephesus
DCIM100SPORT
Modern day concerts are sometimes hosted in the amphitheatre.

Ephesus is an ongoing archaeological dig and there was a huge crane near the amphitheatre when we were there, part of a continuing excavation project.

The archaeological dig continues.
The archaeological dig continues.

Soon we were finished our tour and arrived at a market where you could get camel rides and souvenirs. We laughed when we saw a shop labeled Genuine Fake Watches. But apparently the shop is so renowned it shows up on Google maps of Ephesus.

Genuine Fake Watches!
Genuine Fake Watches!

Our bus ride took us back to town where we were taken on a tour of a carpet warehouse. A woman demonstrated the ancient art of carpet weaving on a loom for us. Each row of the carpet is made by tying individual knots, then tamping them down and trimming them with a scissors.

The carpet folks brought out many magnificent carpets and spread them out before us, inviting us to touch and examine them. Some were quite pricey, especially the silk carpets. We ended up buying a small 15 inch by 26 inch decorative piece as a wall hanging for $200.

The Turks are superb salesmen. After the carpet place we had time to walk around the market stalls near the pier. We didn’t get past the first shop. A fellow standing at the entrance greeted us and invited us to come see his shop. We declined but he went into a spiel about Turkish hospitality and how his feelings would be hurt if we didn’t at least look around. We relented.

DCIM100SPORT
A cluster of shops borders the cruise ship terminal.

He then took us through a maze of aisles and displays to a back room where there was a coffee table and some comfortable sofas. He invited us to sit down and we were brought some wine. Then he talked about his product – leather coats. Now neither of us had a leather coat. We always thought them to be a bit pricey and extravagant. But man, this guy was a smooth talker. He kept bringing out coat after coat, asking me if I didn’t think my wife would look lovely in this coat or that? Didn’t she deserve the best? And so on. He finally brought one my wife rather liked.

One down, he then said I also deserved a fine coat. Well I did and he found one I liked. We then dickered on price. He gave us a price. We countered with a lowball offer. He countered. We negotiated and finally came up with an agreement. And we went back two leather coats richer and around $600-$700 poorer. Benny’s Shop if you’re looking for a nice leather coat while in Kusadasi. We still have those coats and still use them today, six years later. We spent more money in Turkey than any other port we ever visited but consider it money well spent.

We very much enjoyed our visit to Turkey and to Ephesus. The Turks are a friendly people and the country is beautiful. The ruins at Ephesus were amazing.

I’ve added two photo galleries of additional pictures linked below. If you are on the front page, just scroll on down. If you are not, just click on the links.

Follow us on Facebook!

Photo Gallery: Ephesus # 1




Follow us on Facebook!

The photo above was made from several merged together in Photoshop. Below are some more pics of our visit to Ephesus and Kusadasi.

Our cruise ship in port at Kusadasi
Our cruise ship in port at Kusadasi
Some of the ancient ruins at Ephesus
These ruins at Ephesus are part of the Bath of Varius
More ancient ruins
More ancient ruins – lots of truncated pillars
Another amphitheatre - smaller than the main one
Another amphitheatre – smaller than the main one
Lots of feral cats at Ephesus - as there were in Cadiz and at Rome's Colliseum
Lots of feral cats at Ephesus – as there were in Cadiz and at Rome’s Colliseum
The road down to the library
The road down to the library
Another view of the Temple of Hadrian
Another view of the Temple of Hadrian
Carving of the goddess Nike
Carving of the goddess Nike
DCIM100SPORT
The Fountain of Trajan built in 104 AD in honor of the Emperor Trajan
Roman toilets
Roman toilets
The Celsus Library
The Celsus Library with the Gate of Augustus to the right
Close up of part of the facade of the library
Close up of part of the facade of the library
A statue set into the library's facade
A statue set into the library’s facade
A broad boulevard from ancient Ephesus
A broad boulevard from ancient Ephesus
The marketplace at the end of our tour
The marketplace at the end of our tour
Camel rides anyone?
Camel rides anyone?

Continue on to our next Photo Gallery.

Follow us on Facebook!

Photo Gallery: Ephesus # 2




Follow us on Facebook!

Here are some more pics from our visit to Kusadasi and Ephesus. The picture above is of the amphitheatre. It was merged from two photos so the upper left is a bit of a blur.

Welcome to Turkey!
Welcome to Turkey!
DCIM100SPORT
Domitian Square
Part of the Domitian Temple
Part of the Temple of Domitian
DCIM100SPORT
Some more ancient ruins
Along the road
Along the road – you can see the Celsus Library in the distance
The Celsus Library
The Celsus Library and the Gate of Augustus
The archaeological dig continues
The archaeological dig continues
The Gate of Augustus - Celsus Library behind it.
The Gate of Augustus – Celsus Library behind it.
Carpets on display
Carpets on display

Silk carpet - it fairly shimmers in the light. Amazing!
Silk carpet – it fairly shimmers in the light. Amazing!

If you missed the rest of this series, click a link below.

Follow us on Facebook!

A Snug Little Harbor




Follow us on Facebook!

Chania, Crete was our fourth and final port of call on our Mediterranean cruise in 2011. As is always the case with cruises, there were a variety of excursions available, but we opted to explore on our own. We do this in about half of our ports of call and always come away with a satisfying experience.

In this case, a complimentary bus took us from the cruise ship terminal to the old town of Chania. It is Crete’s second largest city. Along with its Greek influence, there are elements of Venetian and Turkish heritage in Chania, most notably in its cozy little harbor.

A moderate sized bay is partly enclosed by a long breakwater which is covered by stone wall and a walkway. At the end of the breakwater is the famous Venetian styled Chania Lighthouse.

DCIM100SPORT
The iconic Chania Lighthouse

The bus drops you off at a few streets away from the harbor and you first make your way through a lively area filled with shops selling local wares and souvenirs.

DCIM100SPORT
Bustling shops in Chania

Heading towards the waterfront, we passed an old church. And then we arrived at the bay. A broad walkway edges the semi-circular bay, with colorful shops and restaurants everywhere.

DCIM100SPORT
Shops and restaurants line the bay.

We walked along the path to our left taking us to the one end of the bay. Across the narrow gap of water stood the lighthouse. Behind us were the remnants of an ancient Venetian fort and a large red brick building, the Nautical Museum.

The bay is accessed by a narrow gap between the western end of the bay and the lighthouse.
The bay is accessed by a narrow gap between the western end of the bay and the lighthouse. The red brick building is the Nautical Museum.

We didn’t visit the museum but walked around the corner and back and then circled the the bay to the harbor and marina. We passed many restaurants and later had lunch at one. A great variety of food is offered and we were amused to see a sign advertising one restaurant’s fare as “cheap and chic”.

Along the way we passed an ancient mosque, a remnant of the Byzantine era. The Mosque of the Janissaries is, in fact, the oldest remaining building on Crete from the Turkish era. It dates from 1645 and stopped being use as a mosque in 1923. Its minaret was destroyed in World War II.

The Mosque of the Janissaries
The Mosque of the Janissaries

We also passed an attractive horse and buggy for hire before we came to the end of the harbor. There we found another maritime museum of sorts, the Chania Sailing Club where they had some artifacts on display and were recreating an ancient ship. I have a pamphlet from this place but it is back in Canada. (I’m in Australia right now) I’ll add additional info if needed when I return in September.

Hania Sailing Club. The building dates from 1607, built during the Venetian era, and was restored in the early 2000s.
Chania Sailing Club. The building dates from 1607, built during the Venetian era, and was restored in the early 2000s. It used to be an arsenal.
Recreation of an ancient sailing ship at the Hania Sailing Club.
Recreation of an ancient sailing ship at the Chania Sailing Club.

We then headed out along the breakwater to the lighthouse, about half a kilometre.

DCIM100SPORT
It’s a half kilometre, a five minute walk, to get to the lighthouse at the end of the breakwater. The marina is on the left.

About two-thirds of the way to the lighthouse is an elevated rampart that gives an excellent view of the bay as well as the light house with the Nautical Museum in the background.

A
A view of the bay from the rampart two-third of the way along the breakwater to the lighthouse.
DCIM100SPORT
The lighthouse is about 135 yards away with the museum in the background across the water.

Eventually we made our way to the bus stop and the trip back to the cruise ship. We enjoyed our visit to the old town of Chania, a snug little harbor steeped in history and picture perfect. Be sure to check out the additional photos in the gallery linked below. Or scroll on down if you are on the main page.




Follow us on Facebook!

Photo Gallery: Chania, Crete




Follow us on Facebook!

Here are some additional photos of our visit to Chania, Crete.

Looking down the street toward the bay and harbor of Chania.
Looking down the street toward the bay and harbor of Chania.
Greek Orthodox Cathedral
Greek Orthodox Cathedral
DCIM100SPORT
A statue of some famous Cretan.  The most famous person to hail from Chania is probably world-renowned folk singer Nana Mouskouri.
DCIM100SPORT
The marina on the left with the lighthouse in the distance.
You can rent this horse and buggy for a ride around the scenic old town of Chania.
You can rent this horse and buggy for a ride around the scenic old town of Chania.
100_1094e
Many restaurants line the walk around the bay.
Did I mention you can get food here that is both cheap and chic?
Did I mention you can get food here that is both cheap and chic?
Inside the Chania Sailing Club
Inside the Chania Sailing Club. A number of artifacts are on display here, including the refracting cover of an old lighthouse lamp.
Janis through the lighthouse lens.
Janis through the lighthouse lens.
DCIM100SPORT
The other side of the Venetian fort at the west end of the bay.
DCIM100SPORT
The lighthouse seen from the west side of the bay.
DCIM100SPORT
The marina and harbor seen from the breakwater
DCIM100SPORT
Looking back at the harbor from the lighthouse.
DCIM100SPORT
The lighthouse at Chania.



Follow us on Facebook!